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Augusta Caroline McCausland Duval (Mrs. Edmund Brice Duval)

Description

Full-length seated portrait shows Augusta Caroline McCausland Duval (Mrs. Edmund Brice Duval) (1797-1832) with brown curled upswept hair. She is seated on a red Baltimore Empire painted couch atop a floral patterned rug. She wears a long white dress with ruffles at neck and wrists, and holds a lace scarf in her proper right hand.

Creator

Date

1815-1825

Materials

Watercolor

Dimensions

Image: 6.5 H x 4.5 W inches; Frame: 13.5 H x 11.5 W x 2.5 D inches

Object ID

1992.4

Accession Number

1992.4

Resource ID

3801

Notes

Mrs. Duval was born in Maryland and was the daughter of Marcus McCausland, a successful Baltimore brewer. In 1818, she married Edmund Brice Duval (1790-1832) was the son of a U.S. Supreme Court Justice. Following his service in the U.S. Army as a captain of the 42nd Infantry Regiment (1815-1818), he returned to Baltimore and married Mrs. Duval. The couple settled in their own home on the property of Marietta Plantation near Glenn Dale, Prince George's County, Maryland. Their life was marked with tragedy from the beginning of their marriage. From 1818-1825, Mrs. Duval bore six children and lost five of them. Despite the many losses, the couple did eventually have four children that lived into adulthood. Beginning in 1828, Mr. Duval had an affliction that deeply effected his mind, putting him in a Philadelphia sanitarium by 1831, where he ultimately died. Mrs. Duval soon took ill after her husband's death, and the birth of their last child, and passed in 1832. She is buried on the Marietta Plantation grounds with other Duval family members.

Credit Line

The Dr. Michael and Marie Abrams Memorial Purchase Fund

Digital Publisher

Digital resource provided by the Maryland Center for History and Culture

Rights

This digital image is made available here for private study, scholarship, and research. Commercial and other uses are prohibited without the permission of the Maryland Center for History and Culture. For more information, visit the MCHC’s Reproductions and Permissions web page.